Rising up to higher virtues: Experiencing elevated physical height uplifts prosocial actions (Study)

“Many challenges of society involve getting people to act prosocially in ways that are costly for self-interests but beneficial to the greater good. The authors in four studies examined the novel hypothesis that elevating (vertical) height promotes prosocial actions.

In Study 1, shoppers riding up (vs. down) escalators contributed more often to charity. In Study 2, participants sitting higher (vs. lower) helped another longer, while
in Study 3 participants sitting higher (vs. lower) were more compassionate.
In Study 4, watching video primes depicting scenes from a high perspective led to more cooperative resource conservation. These studies contribute uniquely to the prosociality literature by documenting previously unexamined effects of metaphor-enriched social cognition, and to the metaphor-enriched social cognition literature by documenting effects of elevated height on real prosocial actions.”

Sanna, L. J., et al., Rising up to higher virtues: Experiencing elevated physical height uplifts prosocial actions, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology (2011), doi:10.1016/j.jesp.2010.12.013

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2 Responses to Rising up to higher virtues: Experiencing elevated physical height uplifts prosocial actions (Study)

  1. Rune Nielsen says:

    If you have a copy of the original article I would love to see it. I can only find the retraction notice.

    Best regards, Rune.

    • Hi Rune, thanks for informing me. Since I’m not a student any more I unfortunately lost somewhat touch with the world of research and science…and do currently not possess a subscription of the journal mentioned there. Nor do I have the article – sorry!

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